New Cinema Technology Helps Blind and Deaf

The lights dimmed in the Tokyo International Film Festival in the theatre as well as the crowd quieted down.

“There was initially little fascination with the film industry to making films obstacle-free, so we chose to undertake this goal ourselves,” said Koji Kawano, secretary-general of not-for-profit Media Access Support Center.

For attendees to evaluation: Seiko Epson’s Moverio and Olympus’ Meg, two brands of headset were distributed in the screening. They both worked in less or more exactly the same way.

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The glasses were linked into a specially altered Android apparatus running a program called UDCast, which could find the movie that is playing by picking up the sound through the mic of the apparatus and listening to get a specific inaudible code which can be embedded by the film company in movies that were supported. Seem to float within the picture on screen and the program then synchronizes to present illustrative subtitles for the deaf which are fed to the glasses, as well as a descriptive sound track for the blind which can be listened to. The program can also be now readily available for iOS, as well as a consumer Android variation is in route.

Kawano, who was once a sound engineer for Pioneer, told The Japan Times that making films harmonious using the head-mounted apparatus calls for just one additional step of adding a specific “audio-digital” watermark to the picture. He explained that they were waiting to jump in, and that all of the required technology has been developed.

At theatres, unique obstacle-free screenings are held right now however they’re uncommon. These screenings feature illustrative subtitles on screen for the illustrative and deaf sound above a radio earpiece for the blind.

Deaf audiences now also possess the choice of seeing foreign films, which are subtitled in Japanese anyhow — but that’s typically not enough, because subtitles for anyone with hearing impairments comprise not just descriptions of sound effects but also the dialogue etc – read this –¬†http://www.uktv-online.com/.

With this particular new technology, anyone who purchases a head-mounted apparatus will soon have the ability to stop anytime by any movie theater. Moreover, in the event the subtitles are translated into other languages, foreigners also can take pleasure in the large number of Japanese movies in the theatre also.

The obstacle-free movement, nevertheless, still has several hurdles it must overcome before the screens may come to market, including the best way to clearly distinguish them -equipped head-mounted devices like Google Glass in order to avoid feeling of unauthorized recording.

Kawano as well as other film industry insiders said they want to spend 2015 giving a test run to the apparatus also to establish rules and regulations. The aim will be to formally install the device when the law to prohibit discriminatory treatment of people that are disabled will take effect.

When the crowd tried out the glasses in the screening of “Maiko wa Lady,” a girl who had been hard of hearing exclaimed with delight, “I can see (the subtitles) definitely!”

Like a modern day variant of “My Fair Lady,” the movie depicts the young girl struggling to master an entirely new dialect, using the aid of a distinct linguistic professor.

Together with the headsets that are unique, observers who are hard of hearing were not unable to check out the subtitles that appeared for the total 135 minutes before their eyes.

Following the screening, Karin Matsumori, a universal design advisor who lost her hearing during her teenagers, told the crowd the descriptions of the background sounds as well as that she became completely immersed in Suo’s picture, having the ability to see the difference in dialects.

Some places were proposed by Matsumori for advancement with room, for example, weight of the glasses — which she said appeared light in the beginning but started to feel more heavy after several hours. The drifting subtitles were also somewhat hard to follow, she said, as they moved every time the glasses shifted around.

She also indicated that because the film proved to be a musical, the subtitles may be produced to dance across the change or display sizes, bringing the tunes to life.

Director Suo, known for his award winning 1996 film “Shall We Dance?,” also talked in the screening, expressing excitement for Matsumori’s propositions.

“I ‘ve always needed to make pictures which are not restricted to some particular crowd,” Suo said.

“Thanks to (this obstacle-free motion), I’ve begun to understand the real significance of pictures for all. It is an excellent new apparatus, and we must (enhance) the shortcomings and allow it to be triumph.”

Read More.

Innovative New Hearing Program Launched

Cathy Zimmerman uses various technology — low and high — to counter her hearing loss.

She uses sign language and has hearing aids and a captioned phone.

“I lost my hearing in my own teens. I did not understand it, because it was slow.”

She’d what’s called sensoneural hearing loss, due to injury to the inner ear.

“I can hear you, and I am reading your lips,” she told a visitor.

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Zimmerman learned American Sign Language about 20 years past but had no one else to communicate with.  Evolving standard practice is required by vocabulary, she said.

Extending one somewhat cupped hand before her face, she illustrated the “selfie” signal.

An organization of “Saturday Signers” consistently meets in the society’s Samaritan’s Well building, next to the St. Vincent de Paul shop, to keep up their abilities.

“We get anywhere from five individuals to a dozen. We are all at different degrees,” Zimmerman said.

“We had a meet and greet in Perryopolis in December for anyone who signed. We got two individuals from DuBois. They needed the social interaction,” she said.

In 2003, when she was 60, Zimmerman began school, earning a bachelor’s degree in family studies and human development .

“I never went to school because I could not hear,” she said.

As a part time job instructor for Transitional Employment Consultants, she accompanies new workers with other impairments or hearing loss as they learn their occupations. Signing the word “thought” — a pinky flick off her brow — she came up with Hear Fayette.

“I understood how isolating (hearing loss) is.

“Cathy not only saw a demand, she developed a treatment for the demand.”

Hear Fayette offers sign language classes two times annually and contains a 725-subscriber list because of its bimonthly newsletters. St. Vincent de Paul worker Jeff Martz, who’s deaf and mute, instructs from the American Sign Language University program.

“Jeff uses lots of pantomime. I do believe he is a natural-born performer,” Zimmerman said.

Contributions are taken, although there’s absolutely no charge for the lessons. Hear Fayette volunteers distribute literature and supply loudspeakers and service referrals.

It is a volunteer centre for Pennsylvania Initiative on Assistive Technology Lending Library, Telecommunications Device Distribution Plan and Assistive Technology.

In addition, it helps with programs for free or low cost hearing aids and telephones.

“It is among the most effective things that ever occurred to me.

Across a tiny display, text scrolls through the telephone ‘s voice recognition technology.

“Occasionally you acquire some funny things. …

The plan has worked with police departments, teaching them the signal for “mistreatment,” so they can comprehend a deaf casualty. It is hoped that many other technologies which can help deaf people will have a focus within these new support centres. Many technologies can help deaf people in all sorts of circumstances, even using a simple VPN program like illustrated here, can allow deaf people to access programming with proper captioning that may only be available in certain countries.

“We want to do as much as we are able to in order to get the term out that we’re here for folks, as well as for others to value the hard of hearing. … I simply wished to help other people who have hearing loss find out they’re not by yourself,” Zimmerman said.

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